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Bone Builders

When was the last time you showed your bones some love? When it comes to your overall health, the human skeleton is vitally important!

Did you know:
• At birth, the human skeleton is made up of around 300 bones. By adulthood, some bones have fused together and we end up with about 206 bones.
• Bone marrow makes up 4% of the human body’s mass
• Our bones will re-grow and repair themselves after a break. Doctors will often place a cast or a splint to make sure that bones set straight.
• The largest bone in the human body is the femur, or thigh bone
• There are 54 bones in the hands, fingers, and wrist

Most people don’t think about their bones very often, but it’s important to take care of them. Just as important as what to eat for healthy bones, is what NOT to eat.

For starters, please ditch the sodas! Soda can sap bones because of the phosphoric acid that can leach calcium from your bones.
Also, watch out for salty foods which can rob bones of calcium as well.
Finally, watch out for excessive caffeine. I’m not talking about two to three cups a day, but anything over three cups could spell trouble. Need that fourth cup of coffee? For real; you do? Okay fine, switch to decaf after that third cup to cut down on your caffeine consumption.

Now that we’ve covered what to stay away from, let’s talk about what to add.

Magnesium – Studies have linked magnesium intake with improved bone mineral density. You can get magnesium from foods such as beans, nuts, potatoes, seeds, spinach, and whole grains. If you aren’t eating enough of these foods, a good-quality magnesium supplement may help.
Potassium – If you can’t stay away from the salt, potassium will surely be your friend! Potassium may decrease the bone resorption that can be caused by a high-salt diet. Look to apricots, avocados, bananas, beans, orange juice, sweet potatoes, and yogurt to get your potassium fix.
Vitamin B12 – Low levels of vitamin B12 have been shown to accelerate bone loss. Yikes! You can find B12 in foods such as cheese, milk, and yogurt, or nutritional yeast for all you vegans out there!
Vitamin C – Vitamin C has been shown to help form collagen in bone. Good sources of vitamin C include citrus fruits, broccoli, kale, kiwis, mustard greens, papayas, strawberries, and tomatoes.
Vitamin K – Although vitamin K is usually associated with blood clotting, it also helps with certain bone-forming proteins such as osteocalcin. You can get vitamin K from asparagus, kale, prunes, spinach, and Swiss chard.

You’ll see that eating for bone health isn’t that difficult, so start incorporating these foods today!

Want health and wellness tips delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up today for my monthly newsletter at http://www.thecaringcoachingcenter.com. Lots of great information, no SPAM (I promise).

Take care of yourself, be nice to yourself, and be well. And until next time – veg in, don’t veg out!
Karen

Who am I? I am a Certified Health Coach and the President and CEO of The Caring Coaching Center, LLC. My mission is to be your partner in helping you reach your health, fitness, and lifestyle goals. Want to get a FREE personalized health consultation? All you have to do is reach out to me at karen@thecaringcoachingcenter.com. Evening, weekend, and phone consultations are available. DON’T WAIT! You’re one email away from getting on the road to better health! Contact me today!

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Four Steps to a Healthy Gut

Trust your gut”
“I had a gut instinct”
“You’ve got good guts; trust them”
“Go with your gut”

Guts are important! Why do you think so many phrases like the ones above revolve around them? To cultivate healthy microflora in the gut, follow these four tips:

1. Avoid fatty foods – There are lots of reasons to avoid fatty foods, and cultivating a healthy gut is one just one of them. Fatty foods can damage the lining of the gut and can raise the level of unfriendly bacteria.

Action Step – Skip the fatty foods and aim for naturally low-fat foods like lean protein and fruits and vegetables. Avoid packaged foods that are labeled “low-fat” and stick to eating real, whole foods.

2. Choose probiotics – Before you run out and buy a supplement, try getting your probiotics from real food. Yogurt and other fermented foods will help you get the good probiotics your gut needs. If you aren’t eating enough probiotics, then you might want to look for a supplement to help you along.

Action Step – Add some of these probiotic foods into your diet:

Kimchi – A spicy Korean cabbage dish that is fermented much like sauerkraut. You can find it the ethnic foods section of your grocery store, or, at most Korean grocery stores.
Kombucha – Kombucha is one of my faves! It’s made by fermenting black tea. It’s got a tangy taste that I find totally refreshing. Be careful though; kombucha can contain trace amounts of alcohol due to the fermenting process, so be careful if you’ll be drinking your kombucha on the go!
Miso – Miso is a mixture of soybeans, barley, rice, and other grains. Miso paste makes a great base for soups. To get the maximum probiotic power of miso don’t let it come to a boil, instead, add it to your soup mix just before it comes off the heat.
Yogurt – Look for plain yogurt and steer clear of the sugar-laden fruity varieties. If you want a natural fruit taste, mix your yogurt with fresh berries and a touch of honey.

3. Control stress – Stress can seriously impact the makeup of your gut flora. Stress can affect your immune system and can cause a sharp decrease in the beneficial bacteria that is naturally a part of your gut. Don’t believe me on the impact that stress has to your gut? How many times have you had an upset stomach or diarrhea in the midst of or as a result of a stressful event? Eliminating stress can help restore the natural balance of your gut and keep everything in good working order.

Action Step – Figure out what’s causing your stress and take measures to eliminate or reduce these stressful things. Practice some deep breathing, drink a glass or water, or get up and take a walk when you feel anxious. If time allows, grab your journal or a piece of paper and write down what’s causing you angst. Learn to recognize the triggers and avoid them whenever possible.

4. Eat prebiotics – You can promote healthy flora in your gut with prebiotics, which contain non-digestible carbs – found in artichokes, asparagus, garlic, leeks, onions, and whole grains. Regular prebiotic intake has been shown to decrease the uncomfortable symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome which affects approximately 25 – 45 million people in the US.

Action Step – Eat up! Make those good prebiotic foods part of your regular dietary intake.

There you have it! TRUST YOUR GUT and take steps to protect it! You’ll be glad you did!

Take care of yourself, be nice to yourself, and be well. And until next time – veg in, don’t veg out.
Karen

Want more of these great tips? Log onto http://www.thecaringcoachingcenter.com and sign up for my monthly newsletter. It’s jam-packed with fun health and wellness information, recipes, self-care tips, and much, MUCH more!

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Uncategorized

Four Steps to a Healthy Gut

“Trust your gut”
“I had a gut instinct”
“You’ve got good guts; trust them”
“Go with your gut”

Guts are important! Why do you think so many phrases like the ones above revolve around them? To cultivate healthy microflora in the gut, follow these four tips:

1. Avoid fatty foods – There are lots of reasons to avoid fatty foods, and cultivating a healthy gut is one just one of them. Fattyfgoods can damage the lining of the gut and can raise the level of unfriendly bacteria.

Action Step – Skip the fatty foods and aim for naturally low-fat foods like lean protein and fruits and vegetables. Avoid packaged foods that are labeled “low-fat” and stick to eating real, whole foods.

2. Choose probiotics – Before you run out and buy a supplement, try getting your probiotics from real food. Yogurt and other fermented foods will help you get the good probiotics your gut needs. If you aren’t eating enough probiotics, then you might want to look for a supplement to help you along.

Action Step – Add some of these probiotic foods into your diet:

Kimchi – A spicy Korean cabbage dish that is fermented much like sauerkraut. You can find it the ethnic foods section of your grocery store, or, at most Korean grocery stores.
Kombucha – Kombucha is one of my faves! It’s made by fermenting black tea. It’s got a tangy taste that I find totally refreshing. Be careful though; kombucha can contain trace amounts of alcohol due to the fermenting process, so be careful if you’ll be drinking your kombucha on the go!
Miso – Miso is a mixture of soybeans, barley, rice, and other grains. Miso paste makes a great base for soups. To get the maximum probiotic power of miso don’t let it come to a boil, instead, add it to your soup mix just before it comes off the heat.
Yogurt – Look for plain yogurt and steer clear of the sugar-laden fruity varieties. If you want a natural fruit taste, mix your yogurt with fresh berries and a touch of honey.

3. Control stress – Stress can seriously impact the makeup of your gut flora. Stress can affect your immune system and can cause a sharp decrease in the beneficial bacteria that is naturally a part of your gut. Don’t believe me on the impact that stress has to your gut? How many times have you had an upset stomach or diarrhea in the midst of or as a result of a stressful event? Eliminating stress can help restore the natural balance of your gut and keep everything in good working order.

Action Step – Figure out what’s causing your stress and take measures to eliminate or reduce these stressful things. Practice some deep breathing, drink a glass or water, or get up and take a walk when you feel anxious. If time allows, grab your journal or a piece of paper and write down what’s causing you angst. Learn to recognize the triggers and avoid them whenever possible.

4. Eat prebiotics – You can promote healthy flora in your gut with prebiotics, which contain non-digestible carbs – found in artichokes, asparagus, garlic, leeks, onions, and whole grains. Regular prebiotic intake has been shown to decrease the uncomfortable symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome which affects approximately 25 – 45 million people in the US.

Action Step – Eat up! Make those good prebiotic foods part of your regular dietary intake.

There you have it! TRUST YOUR GUT and take steps to protect it! You’ll be glad you did!

Take care of yourself, be nice to yourself, and be well. And until next time – veg in, don’t veg out.
Karen

Want more of these great tips? Log onto http://www.thecaringcoachingcenter.com and sign up for my monthly newsletter. It’s jam-packed with fun health and wellness information, recipes, self-care tips, and much, MUCH more!

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Uncategorized

Shrimpin It!

Can you make a healthy, delicious shrimp dinner in about 30 minutes? Sure you can! Check out my recipe for shrimp with tomatoes, spinach, and rice.

As you know, I follow a mostly vegan diet, but I do eat seafood occasionally and when I have company over, shrimp is my go-to dinner staple of choice.

I make it so often that my sister calls me “Shrimp Girl,” no lie, this is my new nickname!
While shrimp may seem like a fancy food that you break out when you have company, it can be a quick dinner on a weeknight as well. What I love about this recipe is you can serve it when you have company, or, you can throw it together in one pan and cook it up on a random weeknight.
Enjoy!

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 can, 28-ounces diced tomatoes – keep juice
1 cup brown rice
1 pound shrimp
1 bag fresh spinach
Salt and pepper to taste

1. Heat a skillet over medium heat. Add oil. Add onion, cook about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes and juice and simmer, stirring occasionally until thickened, about 5 minutes.

2. Stir in rice and 2 ½ cups of water, then return to a simmer. Reduce heat and cover, cooking about 10 minutes (or until rice is tender). Stir in shrimp and spinach and cover cooking until shrimp is pink and cooked through (about 5 minutes). Season with salt and pepper and enjoy!

Want more recipes like this? Sure you do! Visit my website, http://www.thecaringcoachingcenter.com and sign up for my monthly newsletter where I share recipes and other tips, tricks, and techniques in the kitchen.

Take care of yourself, be nice to yourself, and be well. And until next time – veg in, don’t veg out!
Karen

Karen is the President & CEO of The Caring Coaching Center, LLC. As a Certified Health Coach, Karen’s mission is to be your partner in helping you reach your health, fitness, and lifestyle goals. Haven’t yet gotten your FREE health consultation? There is no obligation so sign up today. Just email karen@thecaringcoachingcenter.com to get started!

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Uncategorized

Shrimpin It!

Can you make a healthy, delicious shrimp dinner in about 30 minutes? Sure you can! Check out my recipe for shrimp with tomatoes, spinach, and rice.

As you know, I follow a mostly vegan diet, but I do eat seafood occasionally and when I have company over, shrimp is my go-to dinner staple of choice.

I make it so often that my sister calls me “Shrimp Girl,” no lie, this is my new nickname!
While shrimp may seem like a fancy food that you break out when you have company, it can be a quick dinner on a weeknight as well. What I love about this recipe is you can serve it when you have company, or, you can throw it together in one pan and cook it up on a random weeknight.
Enjoy!

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 can, 28-ounces diced tomatoes – keep juice
1 cup brown rice
1 pound shrimp
1 bag fresh spinach
Salt and pepper to taste

1. Heat a skillet over medium heat. Add oil. Add onion, cook about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes and juice and simmer, stirring occasionally until thickened, about 5 minutes.

2. Stir in rice and 2 ½ cups of water, then return to a simmer. Reduce heat and cover, cooking about 10 minutes (or until rice is tender). Stir in shrimp and spinach and cover cooking until shrimp is pink and cooked through (about 5 minutes). Season with salt and pepper and enjoy!

Want more recipes like this? Sure you do! Visit my website, http://www.thecaringcoachingcenter.com and sign up for my monthly newsletter where I share recipes and other tips, tricks, and techniques in the kitchen.

Take care of yourself, be nice to yourself, and be well. And until next time – veg in, don’t veg out!
Karen

Karen is the President & CEO of The Caring Coaching Center, LLC. As a Certified Health Coach, Karen’s mission is to be your partner in helping you reach your health, fitness, and lifestyle goals. Haven’t yet gotten your FREE health consultation? There is no obligation so sign up today. Just email karen@thecaringcoachingcenter.com to get started!

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